On November 17-18, 2017, the NYU Center for Mind, Brain and Consciousness, the NYU Center for Bioethics, and NYU Animal Studies will host a conference on Animal Consciousness.

This conference will bring together philosophers and scientists to discuss questions such as: Are invertebrates conscious? Do fish feel pain? Are non-human mammals self-conscious? How did consciousness evolve? How does research on animal consciousness affect the ethical treatment of animals? What is the impact of issues about animal consciousness on theories of consciousness and vice versa? What are the best methods for assessing consciousness in non-human animals?

Submission Deadline: October 15, 2017
Location: St. John’s University Manhattan campus
Date: Saturday, November 18, 2017

The Speculative Ethics Forum is a one day workshop-style event in which the most challenging matters of ethics are considered. Ethical approaches of all sorts are welcomed–analytic, continental, ancient, medieval, Asian, and so on. Most papers are invited. However, there are two slots open for submissions. Any paper in ethical theory will be considered for acceptance. Bold and speculative inquiries are preferred to papers that primarily defend ground already gained or papers that are primarily scholarly. The aim, in short, is to have a single day concentrated on expanding the horizons of ethics.

Professors Jeff McMahan (Oxford) and Peter Singer (Princeton) have written an op-ed in the NY Times that aims to call attention to what they believe is the injustice Professor Anna Stubblefield has suffered. You can find the op-ed here:

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/03/opinion/who-is-the-victim-in-the-an na-stubblefield-case.html?ref=opinion&_r=0

Readers are most welcome to weigh in with their thoughts but please do so in a civil and thoughtful manner. Thanks!

I’ll be doing a Reddit Philosophy AMA (Ask me Anything) this Wednesday, Feb 15, 2017, starting at 11am (EST). Do come and join the conversation!

Here is an excerpt of my bio:

I recently participated in a roundtable discussion with LiveScience about HBO’s new TV show, Westworld and the ethics of artificial intelligence. You can watch the video here.

I’ll be giving an inaugural lecture as part of taking up the Arthur Zitrin Chair of Bioethics at NYU on Friday, Nov 4, 2016 from 4-6pm. I would be delighted and honored if you were able to come to the lecture and the food/drinks reception afterwards. Here are some details:

Title: ‘Designing Humans: A Human Rights Approach’
Location: Greenberg Lounge, 40 Washington Square South, NYU
Date: November 4, 2016
Time: 4-6pm

Dean Cheryl Healton of the College of Global Public Health at NYU will provide an introductory address followed by remarks from Professors Bill Ruddick, Dan Wikler, Frances Kamm, Dale Jamieson, and David Chalmers.

Aeon has just published my piece on helping the needy of children of this world, entitled “Why every child in need deserves an urgent response,” which you can read in full here.

Here is an excerpt:

‘What would you do if you saw a six-year-old alone in a public place?’ So begins a short video from UNICEF, which has received more than 2 million views on YouTube. In the video, Anano, a six-year-old child actor, is dressed in different ways and placed in different scenarios. When Anano is well-dressed, we see people actively trying to help her. But when Anano’s appearance is altered to make her look homeless, we see people shunning her and sometimes even telling her to go away.

The full program for “The Ethics of Artificial Intelligence” Conference at NYU, hosted by The NYU Center for Bioethics and the NYU Center for Mind, Brain and Consciousness is now available (see below).

The conference is taking place this Friday and Saturday October 14-15 at the NYU Kimmel Center and the Cantor Film Center.

Full details including abstracts can be found here.

Here’s the book jacket for Moral Brains: The Neuroscience of Morality. I am very grateful to Adina Roskies, Joshua Knobe, and Martha J. Farah for their very kind blurbs! The book should be out in September and you can pre-order a copy at Amazon, Oxford University Press, and other regular outlets.

Yale Journal of Law & the Humanities: Philosophy’s Practical Turn

The Yale Journal of Law & the Humanities (YJLH) is seeking full submissions for a symposium section of the Spring 2017 issue. The journal seeks submissions that employ methods of philosophy (broadly construed) to investigate practical legal issues. The goal is to publish articles representative of an array of philosophical traditions and contemporary issues. The special section aims to exemplify how philosophical approaches and insights provide distinctive and significant contributions to practical legal debates.

Example topics include:


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