My TED@NYC Talk now on Youtube
By S. Matthew Liao

In 2013, I gave a TED@NYC talk about tackling climate change through human engineering. The video from the talk has just been uploaded to Youtube, which you can find here.

Deadline: February 1 2017
Date: April 12-13, 2018
Location: York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Keynote Speakers: Dr. S. Matthew Liao (NYU) and Dr. Regina Rinni (York University)

Submission Guidelines:

Abstract submissions from graduate students on any topic in bioethics, applied ethics, and applied philosophy broadly understood are invited. To help support diversity and inclusivity in our discipline, philosophers from underrepresented groups to submit are particularly encouraged. Abstracts should be in either Word Document or PDF, should be no more than 500 words and suitable for a 20 minute presentation, and prepared for anonymous review. In the body of the email, please include: (a) your name; (b) paper title; (c) institutional affiliation; and (d) contact information. Please send your abstract to yorkgradconference (at) gmail.com. Successful applications will be notified by March 1 2018.

On November 17-18, 2017, the NYU Center for Mind, Brain and Consciousness, the NYU Center for Bioethics, and NYU Animal Studies will host a conference on Animal Consciousness.

This conference will bring together philosophers and scientists to discuss questions such as: Are invertebrates conscious? Do fish feel pain? Are non-human mammals self-conscious? How did consciousness evolve? How does research on animal consciousness affect the ethical treatment of animals? What is the impact of issues about animal consciousness on theories of consciousness and vice versa? What are the best methods for assessing consciousness in non-human animals?

I recently had a fun podcast interview with Rose Eveleth from Gizmodo about engineering humans for a better planet. Gizmodo gave the interview the title “To Stop Climate Change, We Must Genetically Engineer Humans,” which is somewhat of a misnomer since I have never claimed that one ‘must’ genetically engineer humans in order to stop climate change. You can find the write-up here with some thoughtful comments from Rose:

http://gizmodo.com/meanwhile-in-the-future-to-stop-climate-change-we-m us-1733583113

And you can listen to the podcast here:

In celebration of Earth Week, readers of Ethics Etc might be interested in a podcast I did with The Adaptors called “Cat Eyes for Climate Change.”

You can find the podcast here:

http://www.theadaptors.org/episodes/2015/2/11/cat-eyes-for-climate-cha nge

and on iTunes:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/cat-eyes-for-climate-change/id9608 40471?i=335303274&mt=2

You can also listen to it directly here:

Date: Friday, May 22nd-Saturday, May 23, 2015
Location: Jurow Hall, NYU Silver Center, 100 Washington Square East
Time: TBA

Bioethics is the study of ethical issues arising out of advances in the life sciences and medicine. The NYU Center for Bioethics is hosting a workshop with thirteen significant figures in Bioethics who will pair up to address and offer contrasting views on five current issues in Bioethics.

Readers of Ethics Etc might be interested in Newsweek’s cover story in December entitled “Planet Reboot: Fighting Climate Change With Geoengineering,” in which they interviewed me about whether human engineering may be less risky than geoengineering as a means of mitigating the effects of climate change.

The online version can be found here:

http://www.newsweek.com/2014/12/12/can-geoengineering-save-earth-28912 4.html

Stanford University
April 8th-9th, 2015

Sponsored by:
The Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society
The McCoy Family Center for Ethics in Society, Stanford University

Keynote Speaker:
Peter Singer (Princeton University and University of Melbourne)

It is widely acknowledged that global poverty is a matter of great moral concern, and that efforts to alleviate it ought to be pursued. But there is a great deal of disagreement about a range of ethical and empirical issues concerning aid. The purpose of this conference is to explore these issues and to foster ongoing discussion and collaboration.

Helsinki 11-13 November 2014

Confirmed speakers:
John Broome (University of Oxford)
John O’Neill (University of Manchester)

The debates around climate change have renewed the interest in the relation between ethics and economics. The most recent indication of this is the Working Group III report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which takes the ethical foundations of climate mitigation policies explicitly into consideration. For the first time, influential climate ethicists were invited to be among the authors of the report. The aim was to connect the economic evaluation of climate policies to the discussion of the ethical issues.

23-24 May 2014
St Mary’s College, Durham University

Conference speakers include: Thom Brooks (Durham), Clare Chambers (Cambridge), Maria Dimova-Cookson (Durham), Phillip Horky (Durham), Peter Jones (Newcastle), Maleiha Malik (KCL), Mozaffar Qizilbash (York), Martha Nussbaum (Chicago), Sara Protasi (Yale)

CONFERENCE WEBSITE


Overcoming Intolerance: Nussbaum and Her Critics
is a two-day event that brings Professor Martha C. Nussbaum to Durham University. Professor Nussbaum is the Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at the University of Chicago and one of the leading political and legal philosophers today. She is the author of nearly 20 monographs, including The Fragility of Goodness (1986), Sex and Social Justice (1999), Women and Human Development (2000), Hiding from Humanity (2004), Frontiers of Justice (2006) and Creating Capabilities (2011) among many others.

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