Date: October 14-15, 2016
Location: NYU

The NYU Center for Bioethics and the NYU Center for Mind, Brain and Consciousness will host a conference on “The Ethics of Artificial Intelligence” this October at NYU.

Recent progress in artificial intelligence (AI) makes questions about the ethics of AI more pressing than ever. Existing AI systems already raise numerous ethical issues: for example, machine classification systems raise questions about privacy and bias. AI systems in the near-term future raise many more issues: for example, autonomous vehicles and autonomous weapons raise questions about safety and moral responsibility. AI systems in the long-term future raise more issues in turn: for example, human-level artificial general intelligence systems raise questions about the moral status of the systems themselves.

I’m currently working on a book on these topics, so I’d be very interested in your thoughts and inputs. Thanks!

“Normativity and the Human Sciences”
April 24th and 25th, 2015

The 18th Annual CUNY Graduate Student Philosophy Conference
Department of Philosophy, The Graduate Center, CUNY (New York, NY)

Keynote Speakers: Tyler Burge (UCLA) and S. Matthew Liao (NYU)

Schedule of Events:

Friday, April 24th (room 7113, excluding the Keynote presentation)

11:30 AM – Welcome

11:45 AM – 1:00 PM. Tomasz Wysocki (WUSTL) – “Normality: A two-faced concept”

2:15 – 3:30 PM. Asya Passinsky (NYU) – “Norm and Object: A Normative Theory of Social Objects”

Readers of Ethics Ethic might be interested in Princeton Alumni Weekly’s special issue this month on the brain, which includes a Q&A with me about the ethics of neuroscience. Here is the link to the issue:

http://paw.princeton.edu/issues/2015/01/07/

And here’s the link to my Q&A:

http://paw.princeton.edu/issues/2015/01/07/pages/6307/index.xml

Do check them out!

** I’m very honored to be invited to speak at this event. **

“Normativity and the Human Sciences”
April 24th and 25th, 2015
Department of Philosophy, The Graduate Center, CUNY (New York, NY)

Keynote Speakers: Tyler Burge (UCLA) and S. Matthew Liao (NYU)

Deadline for Submissions: January 15th, 2015
Responses to submissions will be sent by March 15th, 2015.

The human sciences (e.g. psychology, neuroscience, linguistics, economics, political science, history, anthropology, sociology, medicine, etc.) collectively aim to investigate our species. Projects undertaken within these sciences seek to describe and thereby explain how we think, feel, perceive, make judgments, interact with one another, use language, and much more.

The final program is now available for this week’s conference on “Measuring Borderline States of Consciousness”, co-sponsored by the NYU Center for Mind, Brain, and Consciousness and the NYU Center for Bioethics.

The conference will be held on Friday October 24 and Saturday October 25 at the King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center, 53 Washington Square South.

Registration is free but required. You can register via a link on the
conference website (http://tinyurl.com/qyb7hok) or directly at
http://tinyurl.com/l4tcxcc.

MEASURING BORDERLINE STATES OF CONSCIOUSNESS

Friday, October 24, 2014

9am-10am: Conference Registration & Check-In

Friday, October 24th – Saturday, October 25th
53 Washington Square South, 1st Floor Auditorium, New York

On October 24-25, the NYU Center for Mind, Brain, and Consciousness and the NYU Center for Bioethics will host a conference on Measuring Borderline States of Consciousness.

There are famous difficulties in measuring subjective states of consciousness. Nevertheless, a number of techniques have recently
been developed for measuring states of consciousness in clinical settings. These techniques have been applied to borderlines states of consciousness: in particular, those found in patients diagnosed with vegetative state and minimally conscious state, and those found in patients under anesthesia. Measures using fMRI imaging, electroencephalography, and various other technologies have been developed.

Readers of Ethics Etc might be interested in an op-ed of mine in Scientific American, which explores the ethics of using brain implants to create supersoldiers.

The online version can be found here:

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/mind-guest-blog/2014/09/04/could-d eep-brain-stimulation-fortify-soldiers-minds/

THE BRAIN MAPPING INITIATIVES: FOUNDATIONAL ISSUES
December 6-7, 2013
New York University

***Note change of location due to high response. Friday sessions will be in Hemmerdinger Hall (Silver Center, 100 Washington Square East). Saturday sessions will be in Greenberg Lounge (Vanderbilt Hall, 40 Washington Square South).

Those planning to attend should register at http://goo.gl/1yVLp9. On Friday, participants should check in first in Silverstein Lounge (next to Hemmerdinger Hall, just inside the entrance to the Silver Center on Waverly Place). Bring ID for the NYU security at the entrance.***

THE BRAIN MAPPING INITIATIVES: FOUNDATIONAL ISSUES
December 6-7, 2013
Jurow Lecture Hall, Silver Center Room 101
100 Washington Square East
New York University

On December 6-7, New York University will host a conference devoted to foundational issues raised by recent brain mapping initiatives, such as the BRAIN initiative, the Human Brain project, and the Human Connectome Project. What can mapping the brain tell us about the human mind? What are the ethical implications? These issues will be discussed by leading cognitive neuroscientists and philosophers.

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