Deadline: February 1 2017
Date: April 12-13, 2018
Location: York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Keynote Speakers: Dr. S. Matthew Liao (NYU) and Dr. Regina Rinni (York University)

Submission Guidelines:

Abstract submissions from graduate students on any topic in bioethics, applied ethics, and applied philosophy broadly understood are invited. To help support diversity and inclusivity in our discipline, philosophers from underrepresented groups to submit are particularly encouraged. Abstracts should be in either Word Document or PDF, should be no more than 500 words and suitable for a 20 minute presentation, and prepared for anonymous review. In the body of the email, please include: (a) your name; (b) paper title; (c) institutional affiliation; and (d) contact information. Please send your abstract to yorkgradconference (at) gmail.com. Successful applications will be notified by March 1 2018.

Aeon has just published my piece on helping the needy of children of this world, entitled “Why every child in need deserves an urgent response,” which you can read in full here.

Here is an excerpt:

‘What would you do if you saw a six-year-old alone in a public place?’ So begins a short video from UNICEF, which has received more than 2 million views on YouTube. In the video, Anano, a six-year-old child actor, is dressed in different ways and placed in different scenarios. When Anano is well-dressed, we see people actively trying to help her. But when Anano’s appearance is altered to make her look homeless, we see people shunning her and sometimes even telling her to go away.

The full program for “The Ethics of Artificial Intelligence” Conference at NYU, hosted by The NYU Center for Bioethics and the NYU Center for Mind, Brain and Consciousness is now available (see below).

The conference is taking place this Friday and Saturday October 14-15 at the NYU Kimmel Center and the Cantor Film Center.

Full details including abstracts can be found here.

Date: October 14-15, 2016
Location: NYU

The NYU Center for Bioethics and the NYU Center for Mind, Brain and Consciousness will host a conference on “The Ethics of Artificial Intelligence” this October at NYU.

Recent progress in artificial intelligence (AI) makes questions about the ethics of AI more pressing than ever. Existing AI systems already raise numerous ethical issues: for example, machine classification systems raise questions about privacy and bias. AI systems in the near-term future raise many more issues: for example, autonomous vehicles and autonomous weapons raise questions about safety and moral responsibility. AI systems in the long-term future raise more issues in turn: for example, human-level artificial general intelligence systems raise questions about the moral status of the systems themselves.

I recently had a fun podcast interview with Rose Eveleth from Gizmodo about engineering humans for a better planet. Gizmodo gave the interview the title “To Stop Climate Change, We Must Genetically Engineer Humans,” which is somewhat of a misnomer since I have never claimed that one ‘must’ genetically engineer humans in order to stop climate change. You can find the write-up here with some thoughtful comments from Rose:

http://gizmodo.com/meanwhile-in-the-future-to-stop-climate-change-we-m us-1733583113

And you can listen to the podcast here:

In celebration of Earth Week, readers of Ethics Etc might be interested in a podcast I did with The Adaptors called “Cat Eyes for Climate Change.”

You can find the podcast here:

http://www.theadaptors.org/episodes/2015/2/11/cat-eyes-for-climate-cha nge

and on iTunes:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/cat-eyes-for-climate-change/id9608 40471?i=335303274&mt=2

You can also listen to it directly here:

Readers of Ethics Etc might be interested in Newsweek’s cover story in December entitled “Planet Reboot: Fighting Climate Change With Geoengineering,” in which they interviewed me about whether human engineering may be less risky than geoengineering as a means of mitigating the effects of climate change.

The online version can be found here:

http://www.newsweek.com/2014/12/12/can-geoengineering-save-earth-28912 4.html

Stanford University
April 8th-9th, 2015

Sponsored by:
The Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society
The McCoy Family Center for Ethics in Society, Stanford University

Keynote Speaker:
Peter Singer (Princeton University and University of Melbourne)

It is widely acknowledged that global poverty is a matter of great moral concern, and that efforts to alleviate it ought to be pursued. But there is a great deal of disagreement about a range of ethical and empirical issues concerning aid. The purpose of this conference is to explore these issues and to foster ongoing discussion and collaboration.

The Journal of Moral Philosophy has just published a special issue on Frances Kamm’s book, Ethics for Enemies. Commentators include Professors Caspar Hare, Suzanne Uniacke, Tom Hurka, Jeff McMahan, Gabriella Blum and John C. P. Goldberg. Professor Kamm als provides a Précis and Responses to the Commentators. Here’s the content of the issue:

Summary of Ethics for Enemies
Frances Kamm
pp.: 373–384 (12)

Torture – Does Timing Matter?
Caspar Hare
pp.: 385–394 (10)

Opportunistic Terrorism
Suzanne Uniacke
pp.: 395–410 (16)

Kamm on Intention and Proportionality in War
Thomas Hurka
pp.: 411–427 (17)

23-24 May 2014
St Mary’s College, Durham University

Conference speakers include: Thom Brooks (Durham), Clare Chambers (Cambridge), Maria Dimova-Cookson (Durham), Phillip Horky (Durham), Peter Jones (Newcastle), Maleiha Malik (KCL), Mozaffar Qizilbash (York), Martha Nussbaum (Chicago), Sara Protasi (Yale)

CONFERENCE WEBSITE


Overcoming Intolerance: Nussbaum and Her Critics
is a two-day event that brings Professor Martha C. Nussbaum to Durham University. Professor Nussbaum is the Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at the University of Chicago and one of the leading political and legal philosophers today. She is the author of nearly 20 monographs, including The Fragility of Goodness (1986), Sex and Social Justice (1999), Women and Human Development (2000), Hiding from Humanity (2004), Frontiers of Justice (2006) and Creating Capabilities (2011) among many others.

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