Deadline: February 5, 2018
Date: October 18-20, 2018
Location: Haverford and Bryn Mawr Colleges (Haverford and Bryn Mawr, PA)

The Association for Political Theory (APT) invites proposals from faculty members, independent scholars, and ABD graduate students for its annual conference to be held October 18-20, 2018, at the campuses of Haverford and Bryn Mawr Colleges. It will consider papers on all topics in political theory, political philosophy and their cognate disciplines, from scholars working in any field at any institution. Faculty members are also encouraged to volunteer to serve as chairs and/or discussants.

As readers of Ethics Etc may know, I had co-written a paper in 2012 called Human Engineering and Climate Change in which we suggested, among other things, that having smaller humans could be a way of combating the effects of climate change. The paper received a lot of attention in the media (see, e.g., here, here, and here) and I gave a talk at the Sydney Opera House and a TED talk on this topic. Paramount has a new movie coming out this December called Downsizing, which is also premised on this idea. Paramount is sponsoring a prescreening of Downsizing at the Museum of the Moving Image on Dec 20 at 7pm (http://www.movingimage.us/visit/calendar/2017/12/20/detail/downsizing  ), after which the screenwriter Jim Taylor (who also wrote Sideways, Election, About Schmidt, Jurassic Park III), a cognitive scientist Heather Berlin, and I will discuss the ideas behind the film. You can watch the trailer for Downsizing here:

My TED@NYC Talk now on Youtube
By S. Matthew Liao

In 2013, I gave a TED@NYC talk about tackling climate change through human engineering. The video from the talk has just been uploaded to Youtube, which you can find here.

Deadline: February 1 2017
Date: April 12-13, 2018
Location: York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Keynote Speakers: Dr. S. Matthew Liao (NYU) and Dr. Regina Rinni (York University)

Submission Guidelines:

Abstract submissions from graduate students on any topic in bioethics, applied ethics, and applied philosophy broadly understood are invited. To help support diversity and inclusivity in our discipline, philosophers from underrepresented groups to submit are particularly encouraged. Abstracts should be in either Word Document or PDF, should be no more than 500 words and suitable for a 20 minute presentation, and prepared for anonymous review. In the body of the email, please include: (a) your name; (b) paper title; (c) institutional affiliation; and (d) contact information. Please send your abstract to yorkgradconference (at) gmail.com. Successful applications will be notified by March 1 2018.

A few weeks ago, I had the honor and the pleasure of talking about the ethics of human augmentation with Neil deGrasse Tyson, Adam Savage, and Chuck Nice at the New York Comic Con! We discussed a range of topics from exoskeletons and brain implants to tiny humans to save the planet and Artificial Intelligence. You can watch the full episode here.

Deadline: December 15 2017
Date: March 8–March 10, 2018
Location: Northwestern University
Keynote Speaker: Niko Kolodny (Berkeley) and Sharon Street (NYU)

Submission Guidelines: Submissions from faculty and graduate students are welcomed, as some sessions will be reserved for student presentations. Please submit an essay of approximately 4000 words. Essay topics in all areas of ethical theory and political philosophy will be considered, although some priority will be given to essays that take up themes from the work of Niko Kolodny and Sharon Street: constructivism, evolution and morality, democracy, subordination, domination, epistemic and practical reasons, friendship and love, liberalism, metaethics, political authority, and rationality. Essays should be prepared for blind review in word, rtf, or pdf format.

Deadline: November 15 2017
Date: March 9-11 2018
Location: University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Keynote Speaker: Selim Berker (Harvard)

The Workshop aims to provide a forum for stimulating and constructive exchange among philosophers currently working on issues concerning normativity, broadly construed to include: the traditional questions of metaethics (and analogous questions about other normative domains); theories of reasons, rationality and reasoning; the semantics and pragmatics of normative language; the psychology of normative judgment; and the nature of epistemic normativity. The hope is to showcase cutting-edge work in these and related areas, providing speakers with useful feedback, and other participants with lively presentations and conversation.

On November 17-18, 2017, the NYU Center for Mind, Brain and Consciousness, the NYU Center for Bioethics, and NYU Animal Studies will host a conference on Animal Consciousness.

This conference will bring together philosophers and scientists to discuss questions such as: Are invertebrates conscious? Do fish feel pain? Are non-human mammals self-conscious? How did consciousness evolve? How does research on animal consciousness affect the ethical treatment of animals? What is the impact of issues about animal consciousness on theories of consciousness and vice versa? What are the best methods for assessing consciousness in non-human animals?

Professors Jeff McMahan (Oxford) and Peter Singer (Princeton) have written an op-ed in the NY Times that aims to call attention to what they believe is the injustice Professor Anna Stubblefield has suffered. You can find the op-ed here:

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/03/opinion/who-is-the-victim-in-the-an na-stubblefield-case.html?ref=opinion&_r=0

Readers are most welcome to weigh in with their thoughts but please do so in a civil and thoughtful manner. Thanks!

I’ll be doing a Reddit Philosophy AMA (Ask me Anything) this Wednesday, Feb 15, 2017, starting at 11am (EST). Do come and join the conversation!

Here is an excerpt of my bio:

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