23-24 May 2014
St Mary’s College, Durham University

Conference speakers include: Thom Brooks (Durham), Clare Chambers (Cambridge), Maria Dimova-Cookson (Durham), Phillip Horky (Durham), Peter Jones (Newcastle), Maleiha Malik (KCL), Mozaffar Qizilbash (York), Martha Nussbaum (Chicago), Sara Protasi (Yale)

CONFERENCE WEBSITE


Overcoming Intolerance: Nussbaum and Her Critics
is a two-day event that brings Professor Martha C. Nussbaum to Durham University. Professor Nussbaum is the Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at the University of Chicago and one of the leading political and legal philosophers today. She is the author of nearly 20 monographs, including The Fragility of Goodness (1986), Sex and Social Justice (1999), Women and Human Development (2000), Hiding from Humanity (2004), Frontiers of Justice (2006) and Creating Capabilities (2011) among many others.

Punishment book launch
By Thom Brooks

Punishment book launch

The Houses of Parliament

Date: Tuesday, 14 May 2013

Time: 17:00-19:00

Place: Committee Room 3, the Houses of Parliament, London

Punishment is a topic of increasing importance for citizens and policymakers. Why should we punish criminals? What purposes should punishment serve? These questions and many others will be addressed in this roundtable discussion celebrating the launch of Punishment by Thom Brooks. Panel members include:

Lord Parekh FBA (chair), Labour Peer and former Chair of the Commission on the Future of Multi-Ethnic Britain

Frances Crook OBE, Chief Executive of the Howard League for Penal Reform

I warmly recommend Robin Attfield’s new Ethics: An Overview recently published by Continuum. The book’s blurb:

“This is the definitive companion to the study of ethics. It provides students with an accessible, comprehensive and philosophically rigorous introduction to the major thinkers, issues and debates. Ideal for use on undergraduate courses, but also of lasting value for postgraduate students, the structure and content of this textbook closely reflect the way ethics is studied.

Fellow philosophers will no doubt be familiar with the curious book, Nudge, by Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein. The book defends “libertarian paternalism” and a view of behavioural economics. While I have not been convinced by its arguments, it is a good read and I’ve half expected Nudge to be the subject of at least a small wave of papers in ethics and political philosophy. I’m not the only one who thought its ideas would find traction: the British government has also commissioned research into how it might “nudge” the public into healthier lifestyles, for example.

2012 ISME Call for Papers
By Thom Brooks

2012 ISME Call for Papers

Deadline for submissions: 15 September 2011

The 2012 International Society for Military Ethics Conference will be held 24-27 January 2012 in Mother Rosalie Hill Hall, University of San Diego, 5998 Alcala Park, San Diego, CA 92110.
This year’s theme will be “Civil-Military Relations and Social Issues in the Military.” Papers and proposals for panels or other program segments consistent with this theme are welcomed.

In keeping with our usual practice, papers on any aspect of military ethics or just war theory will be considered.

The petition can be found here and I urge readers to consider signing it. It makes a point of principle, not politics: that the UK-based Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) — which funds research in areas such as law and philosophy — should remove mention of “The Big Society” in its details of strategic research funding priorities. “The Big Society” was a campaign slogan of the Conservative Party. The principled objection is that the policial campaign slogans of any party should not be included. This would be true if the then AHRB had included “The Third Way” after the 1997 election which saw Tony Blair become Prime Minister. This is not about which political party you prefer, but a statement of principle.

I am delighted to announce that the Journal of Moral Philosophy has launched our new online electronic submission system. Please either visit our online submission page to submit new work here.

The JMP normally reviews papers in 6-8 weeks or less. Our acceptance rate is under 8%. We are a quarterly journal of philosophy publishing volume 8 in 2011. For more information, visit our homepage.

Readers are encouraged to visit this link where they can vote for their favourite philosophy journals. The choice is fairly comprehensive with nearly 130 journals listed and more added daily. There have been more than 10,000 votes registered and there will be preliminary results announced here when 50,000 votes is reached. So visit this link — and remember to vote early and often!

Readers may be familiar with my “Publishing Advice for Graduate Students” which addressed issues from publishing book reviews and conference proceedings to replies, full length articles, and submitting book contracts successfully. I have been genuinely thrilled by its reception as it struck me that there was a real dearth of helpful advice on the subject available. Students only had to hope for an insighful supervisor to teach them the ropes previously.

I am now beginning work on “How to Peer Review” which will address substantive, practical advice on how to best conduct reviews of journal articles and book proposals. This seems to be the new area where good information is lacking.

I am delighted to announce a new book series in moral philosophy:

Studies in Moral Philosophy is a new book series affiliated with the Journal of Moral Philosophy. This new series will publish books in all areas of normative philosophy, including applied ethics and metaethics, as well as moral, legal, and political theory. Research book proposals exploring non-Western traditions are also welcome. The series seeks to promote lively discussions and debates among the wider philosophical community by publishing work that avoids unnecessary jargon without sacrificing academic rigour.

Prospective authors interested in contributing to this series should contact the Series Editor, Thom Brooks, in the first instance.

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